Does Everyone Have a Creative Gift Within?

Photo by Jennifer Sando.

Odd how the creative power at once brings the whole universe to order.
–Virginia Woolf

The idea of people going through their life without a creative outlet saddens me.

I simply believe that everyone has a creative talent within them. I don’t necessarily mean that every person could be an artist, writer or musician etc in a professional sense–creativity takes many different forms and exists for different purposes in our life.

Creative work is effortless to some, while others have a gift buried so deep that they may never get to discover it.

I would not be surprised if there have been clues to such a hidden talent. Depending on the person, it may be easier for them to disregard it, or they may be too busy to notice it, or think it’s a figment of their imagination, or the very thought of doing anything about it leaves them paralysed with fear.

You can learn a creative skill; you can be taught anything if you are willing to learn, but it’s part of our DNA when it seems as though a creative skill comes naturally.

The act of creativity is a pathway to ourselves and a pathway to others. A simple example of a pathway to others is when you read a great book and you feel connected to the author via their writing. Or, when music triggers memories, or you feel transformed by artwork.

The different levels and intensities that creative forms can manifest in people’s lives, and shape lives, is something to marvel at.

A creative activity or craft can be therapeutic for some, while others feel they need it to survive. Some feel called to their craft unexplainably, and for some it’s just about enjoyment.

One of my favourite films is The Mirror Has Two Faces and I’m reminded of the scene where college professor Rose (Barbra Streisand) and Gregory Larkin (Jeff Bridges) are sitting at the table, meeting Rose’s mother (Lauren Bacall) for the first time.

Her mother says, “Rose loves to fold napkins. It’s one of her idiosyncrasies.”
Gregory says, “My God, Rose, it’s art!”
Rose: “It’s not art”.
Gregory: “An artist isn’t only one who paints. It’s one who sets the table, prepares a meal, or teaches in a certain way. You’re an artist”.

That scene has always stuck with me. For the purpose of my argument, which is more about creativity rather than artistry, it got me hypothetically thinking that if we know that Rose enjoys folding napkins in a creative way, then if this were real life, could that have been a clue to a bigger art form? Origami expert? Textile artist? Home stylist?

It’s a theory worth exploring; if you are unsure of what creative talents you possess, you can apply that theory to your own life–what you gravitate towards or what you enjoy doing in your spare time.

Some of us discover more than one skill that comes naturally to us. I was truly surprised when I discovered photography, and how much easier it came to me over writing. I even used that reason (that photography was easier) to be side-tracked from my writing for a few years.

While I do enjoy taking pictures, and it was my livelihood for a while, it is the writing that I prefer to sweat over.

When you explore the ways and reasons that creativity exists, you can see how it is possible for all of us to harbour a creative talent. If I look at my extended family, there is an interesting array of talents on display: a woodworker, Elvis Presley entertainer, DJ, quilter, percussionist, illustrator, glass work artist and scrapbooker. And then the more commonly practiced skills in the family: singers, actors, bakers, visual artists and photographers. It’s an impressive set of skills combined, and this is only what I know about!

Everyone has a creative streak, and I believe this to the extent that when a higher power created each one of us, and we were given our anatomy, our soul, told not to eat the forbidden fruit (ha), we were also blessed with creative bones.

Some of these bones are brittle–broken a couple times and then they heal, some are irreparable, and some are so small–like seemingly dissolvable sardine bones–but they are present.

If you feel that you don’t have creative juices within you, think again. You either just don’t know it yet, or you do but you are too afraid to admit it.

Let’s say that you have a sweet singing voice, but because you don’t sing like Eva Cassidy, you think that your talent is not worth developing. This is a disheartening attitude. Not every creative effort has to be about money or competition or status.

Nurture your creative tendencies. Always. It will open up your heart and enrich your life. You may even help others through your gift.

How to discover what you already have?

Try lots of new things.

I mean, LOTS. The biggest clue is what you enjoyed most as a kid.

To deny creativity within yourself is to deny your spirit of truly being alive.

We all have something to give creatively. Go on a mission to unearth your creative offering. Good luck and have fun! Please let me know about your creative discovery process so far. 2 Comments

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About Jennifer Sando

I am a writer and photographer, and author of the book, Picture In A Frame.

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2 Replies

  1. “To deny creativity within yourself is to deny your spirit of truly being alive.” I’m going to steal that quote as an inspirational motto!

    Saw your website through AW and just wanted to say hello 🙂 ….So, hello and awesome site!

    1. Hi Austin! Thanks heaps. I’m sorry for the delay with responding – your comment was caught in my spam folder. I’m glad that something I said inspired you – that makes me really happy! Cheers mate.

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