Why Is It Important To Be Creative?

Artwork by Catherine Siciliano. Photo by Jennifer Sando.

I’ve touched on the importance of creativity a few times already on my blog, which is why when it came up as the topic of choice for my writing group’s blog chain, I was temporarily stuck for a new way to explore it again.

After being given some rare child-free time to write on a weekday morning, I checked into my local coffee shop, opened my journal, stared at the question once more and the answer came to me swiftly . . .

Creativity is important for self-discovery.

When you take the time to create, particularly on a deeper level, the simple truth is: you find things out about yourself.
The process is usually a surprising and unconscious one. You wouldn’t expect to say: “Okay, self, it’s time to create so I can unearth something about myself today!” Well, I certainly don’t. As part of being creative, patience is one of the least used tools.

The ability to use your creativity can show up in everyday tasks; even in the most clinical environments, highly technical jobs, and logical or steadfast conditions. The option to explore your creativity in an everyday task may not always be enticing, or it may seem that a creative approach is not possible—at first. If you stay open-minded, the opportunity to exercise your creative skill is usually there.

Sometimes the mission is as simple as looking at a problem in a different way. Sometimes it could be as laborious as planning a bathroom renovation project. It is possible that the higher the creative challenge, the deeper the meaning of what it is you discover about yourself.

You may have also thought that addressing why creativity is important would pertain to the more traditional, creative art forms like painting, writing, acting, etc. And if you consider yourself a non-creative, and you’re not particularly interested in pursuing a traditional art form, it doesn’t mean that you’ll miss out or be exempt from self-discovery through a creative process.

By running a photography business, and even being a parent, I used many creative approaches to push myself forward in these roles, and found out many things about myself along the way.

Recently, another writer told me—by the way she had observed my interactions within my writing group—that I was extroverted. This blew my mind. I have always considered myself a shy person, and a lot of that I attribute to my hearing impairment that I have struggled with since birth. By placing myself in circumstances requiring a creative pull, such as running a writing group, or being a wedding photographer, or critiquing someone’s story, it has illuminated my path in my personal development journey. Sometimes, what initially feels unnatural—because fear is doing the talking for you—is what will allow you to eventually find your truly natural habitat.

Here’s another positive.

If you thrive in creative circumstances, you can use your creations for good. Exploring your creativity is another way to find out how you can help others, which helps you establish your peaceful place in the world. This is a direct way of how your self-discovery process can have a positive effect on others. You create something, which sends out goodness into the world, which in turn makes you feel good, and makes you want to repeat the process.

When you undertake creative opportunities, whether successful at it or not, you could view them as a personal timestamp; a mark of where you were on your journey to become who you really are.

When you look at it that way, it makes perfect sense to use creativity for ultimate self-discovery. What do you think? 5 Comments

The following writers from the group, Writers of Adelaide, have taken part in the chain:

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About Jennifer Sando

I am a writer and photographer, and author of the book, Picture In A Frame.

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5 Replies

  1. Jennifer, love this! You’ve hit the nail on the head once again as to why creativity is so important with the self development angle. I’ve always considered creativity’s links to self expression but I don’t think I’ve ever given much thought to it as a self-development tool. Great concept & thanks for the fuel for thought.

  2. Fantastic Jennifer! Very insightful. I loved your reflections about creativity and self-discovery.

  3. Cath

    “…….map of your soul’s evolution.” Love that jen!

  4. Nicely put Jennifer. I particularly love this comment:

    “You create something, which sends out goodness into the world, which in turn makes you feel good, and makes you want to repeat the process.”

  5. Sandy

    Great post! I love this: “When you undertake creative opportunities, whether successful at it or not, you could view them as a personal timestamp; a mark of where you were on your journey to become who you really are.” Thanks so much for sharing!

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