Why My Worldview Shapes My Writing

Photo by Jennifer Sando

All the knowledge I possess everyone else can acquire, but my heart is all my own.
–Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

As part of my decision to start this blog and decide what to focus on, I was asked about my worldview. This article explains how I arrived at mine, and why it’s the basis for all of my writing.

Your worldview is essentially your conception of the world. Before this blog, embarrassingly, I had not yet claimed my worldview because I didn’t know what having one meant. I Googled, and ended up exploring the worldview of Austen, Hemingway, and other writers — hoping it would bring me closer to realising my own. It just made me more confused.

I could feel myself doing that thing that I always do: overthink and miss the point completely. I even texted my mum to say that I was sitting in my room trying to think what my worldview was. (Don’t worry, beer and chips kept me company at the time.) I brainstormed the common themes that I tended to dance around in my fiction. I thought about what I like to read, my favourite songs, and the kind of films that I like to watch. I also asked myself (as recommended by Jeff Goins) this question: what wrecks you? My worldview had become obvious to me.

Love.

Specifically, that we be guided by love, not fear.

Truth be told, I am always drawn to the romantic side of things. My romantic views have carried me through my novel-writing process. For me, the idea of romance is more about zest for life, being passionate about ideas, and pursuing what I am drawn to. The romance is what made me want to write a novel. The romance compels me to show up at my writing desk. It is through these kinds of pursuits that has me believing every person should be guided by love.

Following love tends to govern everything that I do, everything that I feel, and everything that I see. I believe it’s a good way to be, and a good way to lead. It’s the way I want to grow and thrive, and inspire others.

I know that having this standpoint can frustrate my nearest and dearest. However, it explains my sensitivities and it sums me up.

Everyone should love what they do in life. I believe that. This is what led me to want to blog about creativity so that I can reach out to other creatives. There’s that other pesky belief that loving what you do coupled with making money is next to impossible. It’s why I have struggled with writing as a career option. Writers are no strangers to the mindset that you can’t make money from writing. Or, if you are lucky enough to experience this synergy, then it’s only a matter of time before you fall out of love with your passion. (I’m going by popular belief here; I plan to explore this more in future.)

Of course I have thought about the romantic side of a writing career. Repeatedly. The office with a mountainous view that is decked out with my childhood keepsakes; the freedom to go into that office and write whenever, whatever, for however long I want to; gaining praise through writing with resonance; building a following of people who simply love what I write. They are the sort of romantic thoughts that I mean. There is romance in hard work because I know in my heart where that hard work will lead. I’ve seen it and felt it with my novel. I love the story that I am writing and I certainly feel romantic about it. I want to romance my readers.

The Downside to Being a Romantic

Having a romantic view of the world can certainly have its drawbacks. I’ll probably be seen as unrealistic and delusional. Also, a dreamer, but that’s one label that I’ll wear proudly. When you are always drawn to the romantic zone, it can be harder to focus, and I do tend to get caught up in the smaller details rather than the big picture. Most romantics are over-sensitive. If you are indeed a hopeless romantic like I am, then when you fall, you fall hard.

How Can a Worldview Help Writers to Connect to Their Readers?

When readers know my worldview, they know what to expect of my writing. It will help them to understand why they identify with my words. After establishing my worldview and writing with it in mind, it helped me to theme my writing, and my pieces sound like they’re an extension of me. My hope is to form a more solid connection to my readers.

My mum had texted me back asking if I had managed to solve the world’s problems; I felt better knowing that she wasn’t clear on what it meant to have a worldview either.

This post was the first piece that I had written for this blog. I then decided that I wanted you all to get to know my writing style (before I harped on about romance), and so I published a few other pieces like this one first.

So in accordance with my worldview, I wish you all much love, and plenty of romance in the nooks and crannies of your daily life, and in your future.

Do you have a particular way of looking at the world? Leave a Comment

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About Jennifer Sando

I am a writer and photographer, and author of the book, Picture In A Frame.

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